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A Look Behind Sleeping Eyes

Have you ever wondered what your eyes do when you finally close them after a long day of visual processing and stimulation? Let's take a closer look at what happens behind your closed lids when your head hits the pillow.

Firstly, once your eyes are closed, they do continue to function in a limited fashion with the ability to sense light. This explains why a bright light being switched on or the sun rising in the morning can wake you up, while lying in a dark room will help you sleep.

During sleep your eyes don't send visual data or information about images to your brain. In fact, it takes almost 30 seconds for the connection between your eyes and your brain to reboot when you wake up. This is why it's often difficult to see complete and clear images when you first wake up.

Our bodies pass through five phases of sleep known as stages 1, 2, 3, 4, (which together are called Non-REM) and REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. During a typical sleep cycle, you progress from stage 1 to 4 then REM and then start over.  Almost 50 percent of our total sleep time is spent in stage 2 sleep, while 20 percent is spent in REM sleep, and the remaining 30 percent in the other stages. During stage 1, your eyes roll slowly, opening and closing slightly; however the eyes are then still from stages 2-4 when sleep is deeper.

During REM sleep, your eyes move around rapidly in a range of directions, but don’t send any visual information to your brain. Scientists have discovered that during REM sleep the visual cortex of the brain, which is responsible for processing visual data, is active. However, this activity serves part of a memory forming or reinforcing function which aims to consolidate your memory with experiences from the day, as opposed to processing visual information that you see. This is also the time when most people dream.

As for your eyelids, they cover your eyes and function as a shield protecting them from light. They also help preserve moisture on the cornea and prevent your eyes from drying out while your body is resting.

In short, while your eyes do move around during sleep, they are not actively processing visual imagery. Closing your eyelids and sleeping essentially gives your eyes a break. Shut-eye helps recharge your eyes, preparing them to help you see the next day. 

Dear Richie Eye Clinic & LASIK Center Family and Friends,

As we head into the Holiday Season and the New Year, I have some news to share.

As many of you know, we have added some new doctors to our team in the last couple of years. Dr. Josh Spedding OD, our new Optometrist, joined us last summer and is currently seeing patients in both our Northfield and Faribault offices. We are thrilled to have Dr. Spedding on our team and welcome him and his family to the area.

Dr. Cory Miller, MD joined us in 2021 and we welcomed Dr. Mike Reinsbach, MD to our team this past summer. Both are Board Certified Ophthalmologists and skilled surgeons specializing in High Technology Cataract Surgery with Advanced Lens Implants, LASIK, Retinal injections, MIGS Surgery for Glaucoma, as well as the usual medical and surgical management of eye disease.

With the addition of these high performing providers, I am transitioning my role in 2023 to concentrate on Practice Development while continuing to serve as the Medical Director overseeing our practice protocols and procedures. Dr. Miller and Dr. Reinsbach will be assuming my day-to-day patient care duties.

I have done my best over the past several months to tell everyone of this transition plan while personally introducing Dr. Miller and Dr. Reinsbach; please accept my apologies if I missed any of you during this time.

Rest assured, we will continue our commitment to providing cutting edge care. Starting in 2023 look for Dropless Cataract Surgery, Light-Adjustable Lens Implants, and so much more…

Thank you for the Trust and Confidence you have shown me over the past 32 years. Please feel free to call us at (507) 332-9900 for questions, concerns, or clarification.

Sincerely,

Mike Richie, MD

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