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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Eye Floaters and Spots

Eye Floaters and Spots

Eye floaters are spots, squiggles or flecks that appear to drift into your visual field. Usually they are harmless, a benign, albeit annoying sign of aging. If however, your floaters are accompanied by a sudden loss of vision, pain or flashes, they could be a sign of an underlying serious eye condition and should be checked out by an eye doctor as soon as possible.

What are Eye Floaters and Spots?

Floaters, like their name, are specks or spots that float in and out of your visual field. Usually they move away when you try to focus on them. They can appear as dark dots, threads, squiggles, webs, or even rings.

But what causes them to appear? Floaters are shadows from clumps of fibers within the vitreous, the jelly-like substance in your eye, that are cast on the retina at the back of the eye. Usually, floaters don’t go away, but you tend to get used to them and eventually notice them less. Patients usually see them more when they are looking at a plain background, like the blue sky or a white wall.

In most cases, there is no treatment for floaters, people just get used to them, however if there are more serious symptoms that accompany them, there could be an underlying problem such as inflammation, diabetes or a retinal tear that needs to be addressed and treated. If the floaters are so serious that they are blocking your vision, a surgical procedure to remove the clumps may be performed.

What Causes Floaters?

Age: Although floaters may be present at any age, they are often more apparent as a result of aging. With time, the fibers in the vitreous begin to shrink and clump up as they pull away from the back of the eye. These clumps block some of the light passing through your eye, causing the shadows which appear as floaters. You are also more likely to develop floaters if you are nearsighted.

Eye Surgery or Injury: Individuals who have previously had an injury, trauma or eye surgery are more susceptible to floaters. This includes cataract surgery and laser surgery as well as other types of eye surgery.

Eye Disease: Certain eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, eye tumors or severe inflammation can lead to floaters.

Retinal Tears or Detachment: Retinal tears or detachments can be a cause of floaters. A torn retina can lead to a retinal detachment which is a very serious condition where the retina separates from the back of the eye and if untreated can lead to permanent vision loss.

When to See a Doctor

There are some cases where seeing spots is accompanied by other symptoms that could be a sign that there is a more serious underlying problem. The most common of these is seeing flashes of light. This often happens when the vitreous is pulling on the retina which would be a warning sign of a retinal detachment. Retinal detachment must be treated immediately or you can risk a permanent loss of vision. Flashes of light sometimes also appear as symptoms of migraine headaches.

If you experience a sudden onset or increase in floaters, flashes of light, pain, loss of side vision or other vision disturbances, see a doctor immediately. Further, if you have recently had eye surgery or a trauma and you are experiencing floaters during your recovery, it is advised to tell your doctor.

Generally, floaters are merely a harmless annoyance but keep an eye on your symptoms. As with any sudden or serious change in your health, it is worth having them checked out if they are really bothering you. In some cases, they may be an early warning sign of a serious problem that requires swift treatment to preserve your vision.

Dear Richie Eye Clinic & LASIK Center Family and Friends,

As we head into the Holiday Season and the New Year, I have some news to share.

As many of you know, we have added some new doctors to our team in the last couple of years. Dr. Josh Spedding OD, our new Optometrist, joined us last summer and is currently seeing patients in both our Northfield and Faribault offices. We are thrilled to have Dr. Spedding on our team and welcome him and his family to the area.

Dr. Cory Miller, MD joined us in 2021 and we welcomed Dr. Mike Reinsbach, MD to our team this past summer. Both are Board Certified Ophthalmologists and skilled surgeons specializing in High Technology Cataract Surgery with Advanced Lens Implants, LASIK, Retinal injections, MIGS Surgery for Glaucoma, as well as the usual medical and surgical management of eye disease.

With the addition of these high performing providers, I am transitioning my role in 2023 to concentrate on Practice Development while continuing to serve as the Medical Director overseeing our practice protocols and procedures. Dr. Miller and Dr. Reinsbach will be assuming my day-to-day patient care duties.

I have done my best over the past several months to tell everyone of this transition plan while personally introducing Dr. Miller and Dr. Reinsbach; please accept my apologies if I missed any of you during this time.

Rest assured, we will continue our commitment to providing cutting edge care. Starting in 2023 look for Dropless Cataract Surgery, Light-Adjustable Lens Implants, and so much more…

Thank you for the Trust and Confidence you have shown me over the past 32 years. Please feel free to call us at (507) 332-9900 for questions, concerns, or clarification.

Sincerely,

Mike Richie, MD

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