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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Presbyopia

Presbyopia

As we reach middle age, particularly after age 40, it is common to start to experience difficulty with reading and performing other tasks that require near vision. This is because with age, the lens of our eye becomes increasingly inflexible, making it harder to focus on close objects. This condition is called presbyopia and eventually it happens to everyone who reaches old age to some extent.

To avoid eyestrain, people with untreated presbyopia tend to hold books, magazines, newspapers, and menus at arm’s length in order to focus properly. Trying to performing tasks at close range can sometimes cause headaches, eye strain or fatigue in individuals who have developed this condition.

Causes of Presbyopia

During our youth, the lens of our eye and the muscles that control it are flexible and soft, allowing us to focus on close objects and shift focus from close to distant objects without difficulty. As the eye ages however, both the lens and the muscle fibers begin to harden, making near vision a greater challenge.

Presbyopia is a natural result of the aging process and not much can be done to prevent it. Its onset has nothing to do with whether you already have another vision impairment such as nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism. Everyone will notice some degree of loss of near vision focusing power as they age, although for some it will be more significant than others.

Symptoms and Signs of Presbyopia

Presbyopia is characterized by:

  • Difficulty focusing on small print
  • Blurred near vision
  • Experiencing eyestrain, fatigue or headaches when doing close work or reading
  • Needing to hold reading material or small objects at a distance to focus properly
  • Requiring brighter lighting when focusing on near objects

Presbyopia can be diagnosed in a comprehensive eye exam.

Treatment for Presbyopia

There are a number of options available for treating presbyopia including corrective eyewear, contact lenses or surgery.

Eyeglasses

Reading glasses or “readers” are basically magnifying glasses that are worn when reading or doing close work that allow you focus on close objects.

Eyeglasses with bifocal or multifocal lenses such as progressive addition lenses or PALs are a common solution for those with presbyopia that also have refractive error (nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism). Bifocals have lenses with two lens prescriptions; one area (usually the upper portion) for distance vision and the second area for near vision. Progressive addition lenses or PALs similarly provide lens power for both near and distance vision but rather than being divided into two hemispheres, they are made with a gradual transition of lens powers for viewing at different distances. Many individuals prefer PALs because unlike bifocals, they do not have a visible division line on the lens.

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

For individuals that prefer contact lenses to glasses, bifocal and multifocal lenses are also available in contact lenses in both soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) varieties.

Multifocal contact lenses give you added freedom over glasses and they allow you to be able to view any direction – up, down and to the sides – with similar vision. People wearing progressive lenses in glasses on the other hand have to look over their glasses if they want to view upwards or into the distance.

Another option for those that prefer contact lenses is monovision. Monovision splits your distance and near vision between your eyes, using your dominant eye for distance vision and your non-dominant eye for near vision. Typically you will use single vision lenses in each eye however sometimes the dominant eye will use a single vision lens while a multifocal lens will be used in the other eye for intermediate and near vision. This is called modified monovision. Your eye doctor will perform a test to determine which type of lens is best suited for each eye and optimal vision.

Surgery

There are surgical procedures also available for treatment of presbyopia including monovision LASIK eye surgery, conductive keratoplasty (CK), corneal inlays or onlays or a refractive lens exchange (RLE) which replaces the hardened lens in the eye with an intraocular lens (IOL) similar to cataract surgery.

Since it affects so much of the older population, much research and development is going into creating more and better options for presbyopes. Speak to your eye doctor about the options that will work best for you.

Dear Richie Eye Clinic & LASIK Center Family and Friends,

As we head into the Holiday Season and the New Year, I have some news to share.

As many of you know, we have added some new doctors to our team in the last couple of years. Dr. Josh Spedding OD, our new Optometrist, joined us last summer and is currently seeing patients in both our Northfield and Faribault offices. We are thrilled to have Dr. Spedding on our team and welcome him and his family to the area.

Dr. Cory Miller, MD joined us in 2021 and we welcomed Dr. Mike Reinsbach, MD to our team this past summer. Both are Board Certified Ophthalmologists and skilled surgeons specializing in High Technology Cataract Surgery with Advanced Lens Implants, LASIK, Retinal injections, MIGS Surgery for Glaucoma, as well as the usual medical and surgical management of eye disease.

With the addition of these high performing providers, I am transitioning my role in 2023 to concentrate on Practice Development while continuing to serve as the Medical Director overseeing our practice protocols and procedures. Dr. Miller and Dr. Reinsbach will be assuming my day-to-day patient care duties.

I have done my best over the past several months to tell everyone of this transition plan while personally introducing Dr. Miller and Dr. Reinsbach; please accept my apologies if I missed any of you during this time.

Rest assured, we will continue our commitment to providing cutting edge care. Starting in 2023 look for Dropless Cataract Surgery, Light-Adjustable Lens Implants, and so much more…

Thank you for the Trust and Confidence you have shown me over the past 32 years. Please feel free to call us at (507) 332-9900 for questions, concerns, or clarification.

Sincerely,

Mike Richie, MD

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